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10:00 am

Spotlight on Health Archives

June 14 @ 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
York Explore, Museum Street
York, YO1 7DS
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FREE

 EXHIBITION Date and time:Friday 14 June 2019, 10am to 4pm Location:Archives Reading Room, York Explore Library, Library Square, Museum Street (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking not required Event details Have you ever wondered what it was like to visit the school dentist in the early 20th century? Or what you could expect from a midwife in the 19th century? Join us for this free drop-in exhibition at York Explore, in partnership with the York Human Rights City, to find out. Uncover what level of healthcare you were (or were not!) entitled to, and what you could expect from the healthcare professionals of the past. This exhibition, showcasing historic healthcare, has been compiled by students from the University of York in conjunction with Explore's archives team.

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11:00 am

Smashing the Poverty Stigma

June 14 @ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens
York,
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FREE but booking with eventbrite is required

Friday 14 June 2019, 11am to 12.30pm Location:Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking required Book tickets Event details Our Festival Focus Day is based on the belief that poverty can only be truly addressed when those who experience it first-hand are at the heart of the process. But how do you talk about poverty in a meaningful way to people who are experiencing it? Brought to you in collaboration with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, our special Focus Dayintroduces the writers and performers who empower people to tell their own stories, and those at the sharp end with lived experience of poverty. Join us and learn about the challenges young people face today and watch the film Shared Stories. Our keynote speaker is journalist and documentary filmmaker Billie JD Porter, who will talk about poverty and the bigger picture. Billie has been closely involved with Project Twist-It a Think Nation campaign, which explores the challenges that young people face and the need to address the stigma of poverty. Billie will be joined by award-winning novelist Mahsuda Snaith, and Nikki Varley and Keiran Cranston of Twist-It, who will talk about changing people’s perceptions and the idea of an Alternative Census. Our Focus Day continues throughout the day, so why not stay for Activism and Action, Changing the Narrative and a special film screening of the documentary A Northern Soul?  Don’t miss the Beats Bus which will be parked in Parliament Street from 11am to 5pm. About the speakers Billie JD Porter is a British journalist, presenter and documentary filmmaker. She began her career as a music writer, contributing to titles such as NME, Vice, Wonderland and Dazed & Confused. She went on to front documentaries for BBC3 and Channel 4, including the 2017 series, Sound and Vision which she Created and Exec Produced. Billie is the founder of Use Your Voice - an initiative which seeks to make politics more accessible to young people. Alongside the Guardianjournalist and author Mary O'Hara, Billie helped launch Project Twist It - a hub for untold stories, trying to change the poverty narrative.  Mahsuda Snaith is a writer of novels and short stories. She is the winner of the SI Leeds Literary Prize 2014 and Bristol Short Story Prize 2014 and a finalist in the Mslexia Novel Writing Competition 2013.  Her novels are The Things We Thought We Knew (Black Swan) and How to Find Home (Penguin). She was named an Observer New Face of Fiction 2017. Mahsuda has led creative writing workshops in universities, hospitals, schools and in a homeless hostel. She has been commissioned to be a writer for the Colonial Countryside project and is a mentor for the Middle Way Mentoring Project for Black, Asian, Minority Ethnic writers basedin the Midlands. Nikki Varley, also known by her stage moniker ‘Envy’, is a critically acclaimed, Mancunian rapper/songwriter behind Set Yourself On Fire (“Sensational, scattergun delivery and hooks that lodge in the skull” – the Guardian). She is known for her honest, witty social commentary, with the BBC suggesting Nikki for the Mercury music prize shortlist in 2010. She is Director of NoAgender, a non-profit with an aim to lift the limitations of gender stereotypes, and a member of Think Nation’s advisory board. She is also currently Deputy Youth Work Manager/Head of Youth Arts at Europe’s largest youth club, Wigan Youth Zone.

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1:30 pm

Activism and Action

June 14 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens
York,
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FREE but booking with eventbrite is required

Date and time:Friday 14 June 2019, 1.30pm to 3pm Location:Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking required Book tickets Event details As part of our Festival Focus Day, Poverty: How can we tell a new story to inspire change?, find out about community initiatives to tackle the shame surrounding poverty and make policymakers listen. Join TV producer and director Sally Ogden of True Vision Yorkshire as she discusses the film Fighting Shame, featuring a group of women who use everyday items to tell of the sacrifices and difficult choices they face. Meanwhile, Kev Curran and Shelly Reed, will explain how Inspired Youth is embracing the creativity and vibrancy of digital media production, arts and participative inclusion techniques to engage and empower marginalised people. Other speakers include Amanda Button, a co-researcher on an international project exploring ‘The Hidden Dimensions of Poverty’, and Diana Skelton of the ATD Fourth World-UK's National Coordination Team. The session is chaired by Abigail Scott Paul, Deputy Director of Advocacy and Public Engagement at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Our Focus Day, presented in collaboration with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, continues throughout the day, so why not stay for Changing the Narrative and a special film screening of the documentary A Northern Soul?  Don’t miss the Beats Bus which will be parked in Parliament Street from 11am to 5pm. About the speakers Amanda Button grew up in Lincolnshire. As an activist with ATD Fourth World, in 2009-2018 she collaborated on designing a multimedia interactive exhibition called The Roles We Play: Recognising the Contribution of People in Poverty which has been praised in the Brixton Bugle and the Belfast Telegraph. The exhibition was published as a photo-essay book in 2015. In 2018, a film called The Roles We Play: A Model of Genuine Participation highlights different stages of the project as a way to refute stereotypes with people in poverty in control of their own narrative. In 2016-2019, Amanda was a co-researcher exploring “The Hidden Dimensions of Poverty”. In partnership with Oxford University and with academics and people with lived experience of poverty across the UK as well as in Bangladesh, Bolivia, France, Tanzania, and the United States, the research teams defined nine interdependent dimensions common to all countries. Amanda recently helped present this research at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris. On 14 October 2019, she and other co-researchers will launch the British report about this work. Amanda is currently part of the critical friend group for ATD Fourth World-UK's National Coordination Team. Kev Curran is the Director of Inspired Youth, and an award-winning filmmaker and campaigner with 15 years experience of social projects. He studied film and media at Plymouth University and has a first class degree. His first film Inner Sense won a Royal Television Society Award. He is a creative visionary with a passion and drive to work with the people at the heart of the experience to develop and shape his projects. His hard-hitting work has won a series of national awards igniting positive debate around social issues and raising awareness both locally and nationally. Sally Ogden is a Shooting Producer and Development Producer for True Vision Yorkshire. She recently spent two years developing and producing The Truth about Muslim Marriage for Channel 4.  She is shooting Producer for the company’s Bafta nominated Channel 4 series Catching a Killer. Fighting Shame is the first film Sally has directed for Guardian Documentaries. Sally has worked in TV for the past 10 years and was previously a youth worker in inner city Bradford and worked with offenders on release from Prison. She later set up her own homeless charity, City Lights. Shelly Reed is 19 years old and has lived In York all her life. She went into the care system at the age of nine and feels very lucky to have stayed in the same placement throughout the duration of her time in care, with carers who she now calls mum and dad. She now lives independently after being supported leaving care aged 17 and a half. She currently works full time, and wishes to grow a career in sharing her experiences of being in care in order to change the narrative and make a positive difference. Abigail Scott Paul is Deputy Director of Advocacy and Public Engagement at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF). She works alongside poverty activists and campaigners, content creators, cultural partners and the media to drive JRF's strategy and tell a new story about people in poverty. It is one that can boost public understanding, shift negative attitudes and build support for action. Abigail is a framing advocate having led JRF's award-winning Talking about Poverty work. She is passionate about the role of authentic storytelling for systems change, and recently collaborated with Sean McAllister on the critically acclaimed documentary A Northern Soul. She is a true believer in using data and insight to inform the way JRF communicates with public audiences. Twitter: @abigailspaul Diana Skelton's 2018 novel, Until the Sky Turns Silver, was published by Sondiata Global Media and named a finalist by the Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the category of 'social change'. She is currently part of ATD Fourth World-UK's National Coordination Team. As part of ATD's full-time Volunteer Corps since 1986, she has lived and worked in low-income communities in Madagascar, the USA, and France, and has represented ATD at the United Nations and UNICEF. In 2008-2016, she served as Deputy Director General of ATD Fourth World International, coordinating collaboration among people in poverty from the Central African Republic, Haiti, the Philippines, Ireland, and thirty other countries. She is also the author of How Poverty Separates Parents and Children: A Challenge to Human Rights and of Artisans of Peace Overcoming Poverty.

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3:30 pm

Changing the Narrative

June 14 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens
York,
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FREE but booking with eventbrite is required

Friday 14 June 2019, 3.30pm to 5pm Location:Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking required Book tickets Event details As part of our Festival Focus Day, Poverty: How can we tell a new story to inspire change?, we ask how we change the way we talk about poverty. What are the solutions to the challenges we face? Our speakers include journalist and documentary filmmaker Billie JD Porter, who will deliver a keynote speech on how we start to change the narrative when it comes to poverty. Learn how she believes the media can influence people and help us re-think how we tackle the issue of poverty. Billie will be joined by Kerry Hudson, author of Lowborn, and writers Jodie Russian-Red, Shaun Wilson and Chris McCrudden, who are involved in Common People, an initiative to get working class voices into print. Wale Shittu talks about his film Council in Me which explores life on council estates and challenging stereotypes. The session is chaired by Claire Malcolm of New Writing North. Our Focus Day, presented in collaboration with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, includes discussions throughout the day. Why not stay for a special film screening of the documentary A Northern Soul?  And don’t miss the Beats Bus which will be parked in Parliament Street from 11am to 5pm. About the speakers Kerry Hudson was born in Aberdeen. Her first novel, Tony Hogan Bought Me An Ice-cream Before He Stole My Ma, was published in 2012 by Chatto & Windus (Penguin Random House) and was the winner of the Scottish First Book Award while also being shortlisted for the Southbank Sky Arts Literature Award, Guardian First Book Award, Green Carnation Prize, Author’s Club First Novel Prize and the Polari First Book Award. Kerry’s second novel, Thirst, was published in 2014 by Chatto & Windus and won France’s most prestigious award for foreign fiction the Prix Femina Étranger. It was also shortlisted for the European Premio Strega in Italy. Her non-fiction book, Lowborn, took her back to the towns of her childhood as she investigated her own past and what it means to be poor in Britain today. Kerry founded The WoMentoring Project and has written for Grazia, Guardian Review, Observer New Review and the Metro newspaper. Claire Malcolm is the founding Chief Executive of New Writing North and created many of its flagship projects such as the Northern Writers’ Awards, Read Regional and the Gordon Burn Prize. As well as leading the company she also works directly on projects with HE and commercial partners, produces Durham Book Festival, is editorial director of the publishing venture Mayfly LLP and writes a regular column for the trade publication BookBrunch. Claire is a trustee of the national reading charity BookTrust and the Community Foundation for Tyne and Wear. @nwnclaire Chris McCrudden was born and raised in South Shields and now lives in London. Over the years he's been a butcher’s boy, a burlesque dancer and a hand model for a giant V for Victory sign on Canary Wharf. He now splits his time between brand strategy and writing, and is the author of two novels, Battlestar Suburbia (2018) and Battle Beyond the Dolestars (2019). Billie JD Porter is a British journalist, presenter and documentary filmmaker. She began her career as a music writer, contributing to titles such as NME, Vice, Wonderland and Dazed & Confused. She went on to front documentaries for BBC3 and Channel 4, including the 2017 series, Sound and Vision which she Created and Exec Produced. Billie is the founder of Use Your Voice - an initiative which seeks to make politics more accessible to young people. Alongside the Guardian journalist and author Mary O'Hara, Billie helped launch Project Twist It - a hub for untold stories, trying to change the poverty narrative.  Jodie Russian-Red is a part-time administrator, part-time writer in Nottingham. Over the past few years she has primarily focused her efforts on writing for spoken word and has had small writing and performing commissions for Freedom Festival in Hull, Wordlife in Sheffield, and was invited to be a featured guest at the spoken-word event Women of Words in Hull in 2017. She currently writes a weekly newsletter in the form of a personal memoir blog for the School of Culture, Languages and Area Studies at the University of Nottingham, where she also holds a completely unrelated day job processing invoices, ordering stationery and monitoring coffee levels. She is author of The Wedding and the Funeral. Wale Shittu is a filmmaker and videographer who has experience working with global brands such as Google and EON. He also works on short films, music videos and branded content together with his media collective Our Notion Works. Most recently, his directional debut Council in Me, was selected to be screened at the London Short Film Festival 2019. Shaun Wilson was born in 1980 and raised in Wigton, Cumbria. In 2011, after 15 years as a guitarist and lyricist in various rock-and-roll bands, he began learning to write prose. He currently works as a postman and studies towards an MA in creative writing at Northumbria University. In his spare time, he co-edits the University’s creative magazine, Edge. He was shortlisted for a Northern Writers’ Award in 2018. He is the author of Passengers.  

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5:30 pm

Northern Soul

June 14 @ 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens
York,
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FREE but booking with eventbrite is required

Friday 14 June 2019, 5.30pm to 8pm Location:Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking required Book tickets Event details Our Festival Focus Day concludes with a special screening of Sean McAllister’s documentary, A Northern Soul (10Ft Films, 2018), an essential film for anyone wishing to understand the reality of life for many working people locked in poverty in Britain today. Set in Hull, the film’s central protagonist, Steve Arnott, is a factory worker nurturing a long-held ambition to take hip-hop to the deprived estates of the city. His employers donate a van which is converted into a recording studio and decorated with graffiti. The Beats Bus is taken by Steve and his team of volunteers into schools with the aim of engaging disadvantaged youngsters, with the film vividly demonstrating how music and culture has the potential to transform young people’s lives. At the same time, the film explores the everyday reality of life for many workers up and down the country, trapped by debt and low pay, unable to break free from the restrictions poverty places on them. "How long do you hold on to your dream?" Steve asks. Join us for a festival film screening, followed by a chance to put your questions to Sean and Steve. Our Focus Day, Poverty: How can we tell a new story to inspire change?, presented in collaboration with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, includes discussions throughout the day. Also, don’t miss the Beats Bus which will be parked in Parliament Street from 11am to 5pm. About the speakers Sean McAllisteris an award-winning documentary filmmaker. Born in Hull, he is a director and producer, known for films including A Syrian Love Story (2015), The Reluctant Revolutionary(2012) and Japan: A Story of Love and Hate (2008).His films portray, with intimacy and frankness, people from different parts of the world who are struggling to survive but are survivors, caught up in political and personal conflict, trying to make sense of the world we live in. While back in his home town as the Creative Director of the Opening Ceremony for Hull’s UK City of Culture 2017, Sean encountered Steve, a struggling warehouse worker with a dream. A Northern Soul is a documentary following Steve’s attempts to make a positive impact on his community by travelling with a hip-hop tour bus.

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6:30 pm

Fighting for Women’s Rights in France and the UK

June 14 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Merchant Adventurers’ Hall, Fossgate
York,
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FREE but booking with eventbrite is required

Friday 14 June 2019, 6.30pm to 7.30pm Location:Merchant Adventurers' Hall, Fossgate (Map) Audience:Open to the public Admission:Free admission, booking required Book tickets Event details Join us for a Franco-British perspective on the history of feminism. How has feminism developed on both sides of the Channel? How have historic mobilisations around women’s rights unfolded in France and the United Kingdom, and what bridges can be built between our political and cultural traditions whose universalism is also rooted in varied historical contexts? Christine Bard of the Université d’Angers and Laura Schwartz of the University of Warwick will discuss the major achievements of the feminist movement and the issues that it faces today. The session will be introduced by Catherine Robert, a former Higher Education Attaché at the French Embassy in London, and will be chaired by Alice Béja, Higher Education and Research Attachée at the French Embassy in the UK. This event is presented by the French Embassy in the UK.  You may also be interested in the Festival Focus Day, A Date with History: Fashion, Food and Feminism, on Saturday 15 June. and special Festival screenings of the French films The Goddesses of Food on Monday 10 June and Carole Roussopoulos, Une Femme à la Caméra on Tuesday 11 June. About the speakers Christine Bard is Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the Université d’Angers and specialises in gender and feminism. Her work encompasses: feminism, including Les filles de Marianne. Histoire des féminismes. 1914-1940 (Fayard, 1995) and Dictionnaire des féministes: France, 18ème-21ème siècle (co-edited with S. Chaperon, PUF, 2017); clothing and gender, including Une histoire politique du pantalon (Le Seuil, 2010); cross-dressing; and anti-feminist discourse with Un siècle d’antiféminisme (Fayard, 1999). Christine also plays a key role in the preservation of feminist historical sources and founded the association Archives du féminisme. Dr Alice Béja is Higher Education and Research Attachée with the French Embassy in the UK. She is a former student of the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon and holds a PhD in American Studies from the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle. She joined the Lille Institute of Political Studies in 2015, and is a researcher in the social sciences research center CERAPS (UMR 8026). Her research focuses on anarchism in the United States, the cultural history of the US-American left and the relationship between politics and literature. She has published John Dos Passos, la littérature et la politique (Honoré Champion, 2015). An editor at the French social sciences journal Esprit between 2011 and 2015, she is now a member of the editorial board. Catherine Robert is Associate Professor at Sorbonne Université (German Studies). She has a particular interest in German foreign policy, colonial and postcolonial history. From 2013 to 2017 she was Higher Education Attaché at the French Embassy in London and initiated A Date with History. She was the Director of the Institut Français in Bonn from 2008 to 2012. Laura Schwartz is Associate Professor of Modern British History at the University of Warwick. Her new book Feminism and the Servant Problem: Class and Domestic Labour in the Women's Suffrage Movement is coming out with Cambridge University Press in the summer. She has published widely on British feminism and radical politics including Infidel Feminism: Secularism, Religion and Women's Emancipation, England 1830-1914 (Manchester University Press, 2013) and A Serious Endeavour: Gender, Education and Community at St. Hugh's, 1886-2011 (Profile Books, 2011).    

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